Why you BANNED on Google/Facebook Ads OR YOUR PROXY HAS DIED

beatzcash777

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Hi all!
Today I will tell you why you are banned (one of the reasons) by any advertising platform, especially Google and Facebook Ads, and also why soon all proxy services will be useless for high-quality traffic arbitrage.

For any activity where you need to use an array of accounts, you use proxy services, good, bad, no matter what.
For what? Most likely to hide your true ip address:
- the advertising system thought that you were from another place
- the ad system thought it was a new device
But what if I tell you that now it’s already, and in the future it will be totally everywhere advertising systems will be able to see your true ip address even if you use at least 10 proxies?

You probably know that Internet traffic goes over an http connection, which will be discussed today. Since the standardization of HTTP/1.1 in 1997, HTTP has become the main application layer protocol. Over the years, HTTP has had to be significantly upgraded to keep up with the evolution of Internet technologies and to enable the exchange of a huge variety of content on the World Wide Web. Over the years, HTTP has evolved from HTTP/1.0 to HTTP/1.1 and then to HTTP/2. With each iteration, new features were added to the protocol to meet the needs of the users of the time, such as application layer requirements, security requirements, session handling, and media types. But since 2021, a new HTTP3 protocol has been actively introduced, and Google, Facebook, and Twitter services are already using it. I will not show the differences between versions 1 and 2, you can look at this information on the Internet for our topic, this is not relevant, for that I will show the differences between http2 and http3.

First of all, we need to know and understand the difference between the TCP and UDP transport layer protocols, you can look it up on the Internet, but in short - TCP is slower and more reliable, pre-establishes a handshake between the server and the client and then transmits data packets if the transmission input some package is lost, it is sent again; UDP is simpler, it doesn't need to establish a connection, it just transmits packets and that's it. TCP is used where accurate and confirmed data transfer is required - for example, sending photos, or correspondence between users. UDP, in turn, is needed for communication in voice format, or when transmitting streaming video, for example, from webcams or IP cameras.

And so let's consider the scheme of working with a proxy using the http2 application protocol:
http2.jpg
HTTP uses TCP and UDP as its transport to transfer data to the proxy server, and the proxy transfers data to the server we need only via TCP, for example, to Google.
This way Google will only see the IP of our proxy server. I want to note that 99% of all proxies work on tcp.
And now let's look at the scheme of work http3:
http3.jpg
And this is where the fun begins!
The original name of HTTP/3 is HTTP-over-QUIC. And its main difference from previous versions is that it uses the new QUIC transport protocol, and due to this it transfers data faster.
QUIC (Quick UDP Internet Connection) is a transport protocol based on UDP. It was developed by Google in 2012.
If a user connects to a resource via Wi-Fi, and then switches to a mobile network, his IP changes, and the connection must be re-established. There is no such problem with QUIC. In this protocol, instead of addresses and ports, the connection identifier is used - Connection UUID. And it does not change when moving from Wi-Fi to a mobile network. This means that the connection remains, and nothing needs to be reopened. QUIC works directly with your end device.
1. If the client and server communicate for the first time, they first establish a TCP connection.
2. But in the first HTTP response, the server includes the information that it supports QUIC and HTTP/3.
3. If the client also supports them, it switches to HTTP/3 and sends UDP packets.
4. The client remembers that this resource supports HTTP/3 and will use this protocol for the next requests.

Thus, Google, using the http3 protocol via UDP, sees your end device and its ip, bypassing the proxy server. Google logically compares your TCP IP and UDP IP in the antifraud system, sees their difference, and triggers, obviously you want to deceive Google :) All your efforts to anonymize and create the appearance of a respectable user have been flushed down the toilet.

At the moment, HTTP / 3 is supported by default by Chrome, as it is the brainchild of Google, which is creating the QUIC protocol. Firefox also supports HTTP/3 in versions 88+ . Safari 14 also works with HTTP / 3, but here you need to check the corresponding box to activate support. In addition to Google, one of the first to support the latest version of the protocol was the CloudFlare platform.
gmail.jpg
In this picture, I demonstrated the transmission of packets on the google mail page, it is clearly visible that Google already uses this protocol in some of its files and services, in particular recaptcha !!! And if you log into your google chrome and type 'chrome://flags/#enable-quic' in an empty tab you will find that quic features are already enabled by default!

I want to note that only Google, Facebook and twitter are fully working with http3, a large number of sites remain overboard the http3-quic ship, and someone can work quietly, but this is only up to a certain time, I think within 4-6 years at least half of the Internet will switch to the new protocol, since it has great advantages for a simple user and for sites.

I wish you all good luck in your work, write comments and put your reactions! :)
 

beatzcash777

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So what will be the solution for this?
I see the solution of finding and using programs for transforming traffic with a proxy server, I heard there is a "proxy3", it can do this and now I am studying its use, as well as finding and using proxy services that support UDP, but there are very few of them, or raise your proxies with such support. There is also information that mobile proxies can solve this problem, but I have not yet found a technical justification
 
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